Growing into Leadership (2)

“I, Tertius, the one writing this letter for Paul, send my greetings.”                  Ro 16:22 NLT

Paul surrounded himself with people who were willing to lay down their lives for him (See Ro 16:3-4). Some of them are virtually unknown. Ever hear of Tertius? He recorded Paul’s thoughts so we could read them. We all know about Timothy, but do you know about Gaius? “He is my host and also serves as host to the whole church” (Ro 16:23 NLT). Many served in the shadows so Paul could work in the limelight. Sadly, when some leaders arrive at the top they spend their time trying to push others off it. They play “king of the hill” because of immaturity, insecurity and competitiveness. That may work for a time, but it doesn’t last long. When your goal is to knock others down, your time and energy are spent watching out for people you think would do the same to you. It’s a miserable way to live, and it’s no fun for those who have to work with you. Jules Ormont said, “A great leader never sets himself above his followers except in carrying responsibilities.” If you’re in a leadership position, don’t rely on your title to convince people to follow you. Build relationships. Win people over. When you don’t love people, you’re only a few steps away from manipulating them. When that happens you’ll have a high turnover. A few years ago the three great tenors—José Carreras, Plácido Domingo, and Luciano Pavarotti—were performing together. When a reporter tried to find out if there was any rivalry among the superstars, Domingo said, “No, you can’t be rivals when you’re together making music.”

http://theencouragingword.wordpress.com/2012/10/24/growing-into-leadership-2/

 

Growing into Leadership (3)

“Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me.”                 Ps 139:23 NLT

In his Pogo cartoon strip, Walt Kelly said, “We have met the enemy, and he is us.” The hardest person in the world to lead will always be yourself. Human nature seems to endow us with the ability to size up everybody except ourselves. After having a victorious Goliath experience, followed by a devastating Bathsheba experience, the Psalmist wrote, “Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. Point out anything in me that offends you, and lead me along the path of everlasting life” (vv.23-24 NLT). That’s a prayer you need to pray every day because we all have two problems. What are they? (1) We don’t see ourselves as we see others. If we don’t look at ourselves honestly and realistically, we will never understand where our personal difficulties lie. And if we can’t see them, we won’t be able to lead ourselves effectively. It’s said that Frederick the Great of Prussia met an old man who was walking ramrod straight in the opposite direction. “Who are you?” Frederick asked. “I am a king,” replied the old man. Frederick laughed. “Over what kingdom do you reign?” Proudly the old man replied, “Over myself.” (2) We are harder on others than we are on ourselves. We judge others according to their actions, while we tend to judge ourselves according to our intentions. When we do the wrong thing, we let ourselves off the hook because we believe our motives were good. And the problem is, we are usually willing to do that over and over before requiring ourselves to change!

http://theencouragingword.wordpress.com/2012/10/25/growing-into-leadership-3/

Growing into LeadershipGrowing into Leadership (4)

“The heart of the discerning acquires knowledge; the ears of the wise seek it out.” Pr 18:15 NIV

The story’s told of two Irishmen out hunting, when one of them falls to the ground. He doesn’t seem to be breathing and his eyes are rolled back in his head. The other guy whips out his cell phone and calls 911. Frantically, he tells the operator, “Paddy is dead! What can I do?” The operator says, “Just take it easy. First let’s make sure he’s dead.” There is silence, then a shot is heard. The guy’s voice comes back on the line and says, “Okay, he’s dead, now what?” When you are under pressure you can fail to hear what’s being communicated, and the results can be fatal. So: (1) In order to lead people you must first understand them. You must have insight into the human heart. Sensitivity toward the hopes and dreams of people is essential for connecting with people and motivating them. (2) Listening can keep problems from escalating. Good leaders are attentive to small issues. They pay attention to their intuition. Not only do they listen to what’s being said, they also hear what’s not being said. They are secure enough to ask for honest feedback, and not become defensive when they receive it. (3) Listening establishes trust. Dr. David Burns, Adjunct Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Stanford University School of Medicine, said, “The biggest mistake you can make in trying to talk convincingly, is to put your highest priority in expressing your own ideas and feelings. What people really want is to be listened to, respected, and understood. The moment they are, they become more motivated to understand your point of view.”

http://theencouragingword.wordpress.com/2012/10/26/growing-into-leadership-4/

 

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